Drive

Porsche unleashes new 911 Turbo models

Porsche 911 Turbo S' interior features automatic climate control and a universal multimedia interface, enabling the driver to connect any Bluetoorh-enabled smartphone or MP3 player to the car's systems for hands-free audio and phonecalls. - AFP picPorsche 911 Turbo S' interior features automatic climate control and a universal multimedia interface, enabling the driver to connect any Bluetoorh-enabled smartphone or MP3 player to the car's systems for hands-free audio and phonecalls. - AFP pic

BERLIN, May 3 — Longer wheelbase, larger wheels, a more powerful engine and a lighter frame all combine to keep the latest 911 Turbo and Turbo S at the forefront of automotive technology and performance.

Capable of going from 0-100kph in 3.1 seconds and on to 316kph thanks to a 3.8-litre, flat-six, twin turbocharged engine, the latest Porsche Turbo S has been built to redefine the benchmarks its predecessors set over the past 40 years.

2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the Porsche 911, but it also marks 40 years since the first 911 Turbo prototype went on public display.

And while the best way to celebrate the 911’s legacy is with a year of processions, owner events and classic races, the best way to honor the Turbo’s birthday is by trying to build the best version of the model yet.

Available in two slightly different specifications, the Turbo S and the standard Turbo are the first force-aspirated Porsches to use the active rear axle steering technology that the company debuted on the 911 GT3 earlier this year.

With this system, at speeds below 50kph when the front wheels turn, the rear wheels also turn, in the opposite direction, to reduce the car’s turning circle and increase agility.

At higher speeds – above 80kph – the rear wheels move in the same direction (parallel to the front wheels) to keep the rear end of the car under control and almost eliminating lift-off oversteer and the risk of losing control altogether when getting a little overconfident in the corners.

After all, the Porsche 911 Turbo still has its engine positioned squarely over the rear wheels, rather than at equidistance between the front and rear axles a la Ferrari, Lamborghini and McLaren—hence the need to address issues of balance and control.

Handling is also improved via the car’s adaptive aerodynamics kit which combines retractable front and rear spoilers to increase or reduce downforce when needed.

The front, chin spoiler in particular is an intelligent addition because while extra downforce is a necessity when on the track, a huge, fixed chin spoiler makes a car such as this impossible to drive on normal roads due to the lack of ground clearance.

Being able to retract it completely for city center and low-speed driving makes the car even more practical.

Practical may seem like a strange adjective to describe a €167,000 (RM664,418) supercar, but as well as technological advances, the Porsche 911 Turbo has a reputation for solidity and reliability.

Other positives include the extended wheelbase—the car is now 100 mm longer and 28 mm wider and sits on all-new 20-inch wheels.

Porsche has carried over the electronic steering system from the standard 911 to this model which, although technologically superb, may frustrate long-time Porsche customers, who are used to feeling with the 911 like an integral part of the car in terms of tactile sensation.

Unlike the 911 GT3, which is an out-and-out racing car, the Porsche 911 Turbo benefits from a comfortable cabin outfitted in high-end materials and a Bose sound system, radar-guided cruise control, camera-based road sign recognition and very supportive seats with 18-way adjustment to suit any driver’s preferred position.

The Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S are available to order now and the first examples are expected to be delivered this September.

The 911 Turbo will start at US$148,300 (RM450,000) and the Turbo S—which comes with Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control, the Sport Chrono Package (for timing laps and measuring racing performance) and Ceramic Composite Brakes as standard  - from US$181,100. - AFP-Relaxnews

 

 

Comments