Malaysia

Advance voting replaces postal voting for security forces

By Yow Hong Chieh
December 19, 2011
Latest Update: December 19, 2011 11:45 pm

Aziz said postal voting would still be allowed in situations where members of the security forces cannot make it for advanced polling. — file picAziz said postal voting would still be allowed in situations where members of the security forces cannot make it for advanced polling. — file picPUTRAJAYA, Dec 19 — Military and police personnel will be allowed to cast their ballot in person ahead of time and will no longer be registered as postal voters by default, the Election Commission (EC) said today.

EC chairman Tan Sri Abdul Aziz Yusof said that advance voting was identical to regular voting except that it would be held a couple of days before polling day for military personnel, their spouses and policemen at their respective camps.

“The process is the same as regular voting with ballot boxes. There are no envelopes ...

“It’s just held earlier by two or three days so they can go back on duty by polling day,” he told reporters at the EC’s office here.

But Aziz said postal voting would still be allowed in situations where members of the security forces cannot make it for advance polling.

“Those who cannot vote on advance polling day can apply to their returning officers to be postal voters,” he said, adding that the rules for postal voting would remain the same.

The postal voting system utilised by the military and police has often been criticised by the opposition for allegedly being open to abuse as party agents are not allowed into army camps to monitor the voting process.

Some have called for the system to be reformed so that only police and military personnel who are on active duty cast their ballots via post.