Malaysia

Home ministry denies Musa’s ‘interference’ claim

Musa alleged that some parties had bypassed him and issued orders directly to his men. — file picMusa alleged that some parties had bypassed him and issued orders directly to his men. — file picKUALA LUMPUR, Sept 8 — The home ministry today denied it had meddled in police matters, as claimed by outgoing Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Tan Sri Musa Hassan yesterday.

Home ministry secretary-general Datuk Seri Mahmood Adam explained that the ministry’s involvement in weekly meetings with the police to discuss resource allocations and review case files might have given rise to such a perception.

“Sometimes the recommendations... of the Royal Malaysian Police cannot be considered by the home ministry so we are seen as interfering,” Mahmood said after witnessing Musa hand over control of the police force to Tan Sri Ismail Omar at Bukit Aman Police Headquarters here today.

Yesterday, Musa spoke out against what he saw as excessive interference by “third parties” in police business, naming the home ministry among others.

“All kinds of people interfere. People from the ministry itself, outsiders, people with vested interests like those who want to do things that are not right — they will try to interfere,” he had said.

However, he refused to comment on whether Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein, with whom he is rumoured to have a strained relationship, was the person responsible for the meddling.

Following this revelation, Pakatan Rakyat lawmakers urged the top cop to lodge reports with an ombudsman, the Public Complaints Bureau and the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC) to eradicate such problems from the police force.

Musa today appeared to have taken the suggestion to heart, maintaining that he will consider pursuing further action regarding the alleged third-party interference.

“I’ll have a look,” he said simply when asked by reporters.

However, he declined to identify individuals who may have interfered in police affairs or comment further on Mahmood’s statement.

Musa’s allegations yesterday appeared to be a repeat of comments he made about an interfering “third force” in a March interview with Mingguan Malaysia.

In it, he claimed that politicians and “certain individuals” had issued orders directly to his subordinates in contravention of Section 4 of the Police Act 1957, which states that all actions and supervision falls under the IGP.

Around the same time, reports surfaced that Musa had tendered his resignation due to differences with Hishammuddin. Musa, however, denied that he had given notice, and instead accused “some quarters” of wanting to remove him from his post.

Hishammuddin invariably gave fodder to the rumour mill when he said over a week later that he knew who would replace Musa, despite keeping mum on whether or not Musa’s contract would be extended.

The home minister finally ended speculation when he announced last Wednesday that Deputy IGP Ismail would replace Musa as the country’s new IGP come September 13. Hishammuddin added that Internal Security and Public Order Director Commissioner Datuk Hussin Ismail would be the new deputy IGP.

Mahmood today also denied that the home ministry had not informed Musa that his contract would not be renewed a third time.

He stressed that he had informed Musa verbally that his contact would not be extended a week before Hishammuddin announced the new IGP, and again on the day of the announcement itself.

Mahmood added that a formal letter of termination will be issued to Musa once the prime minister presents his recommendation to the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, in accordance with the requirements of the Federal Constitution.

 

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