Malaysia

Malaysia a republic under PR’s rule, says Perkasa

By Mohd Farhan Darwis
April 17, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, April 17 – Malaysia may turn into a republic instead of a constitutional monarchy if Pakatan Rakyat (PR) takes Putrajaya, Perkasa warned today.

The right-wing Malay group accused the opposition bloc of having ridiculed the country’s Malay rulers during the installation ceremony of the country’s Yang Di-Pertuan Agong last week.

“Perkasa feels that it is an indication that they might slowly transform Malaysia into a republic, a country with no king,” Perkasa vice-president Datuk Abd Rahman Abu Bakar said during a press conference at the Dang Wangi Police headquarters, where they were applying for a permit to hold an assembly in conjunction with the King’s installation.

Abd Rahman said that Perkasa would fight against any parties who would try to turn Malaysia into a republic, as well as continue to defend the Malay rulers.

Abd Rahman said the NGO was planning an assembly to do so at Padang Merbok on April 29, one day after the Bersih 3.0 assembly in Dataran Merdeka.

“If the police do not give us permission to gather at the location, Perkasa might apply at other locations in this city such as Dataran Merdeka, or whichever location that DBKL approves,” he said.

He also said that Jalur Tiga (Jati), an organisation headed by controversial Gombak Setia assemblyman Datuk Hasan Ali, had also been invited to take part.

“We wish to celebrate by having this gathering as a show our appreciation, as well as to pray that the Agong’s installation will be long-lasting. We also extend an invitation to Jati because our goals are similar.

“Perkasa did not have the chance to visit Balairong Seni, Istana Negara during the installation. If we had, we would have been polite and not behaved improperly the way the opposition leaders had,” he said.

Abd Rahman also said Perkasa would carry on its support for anti-LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered) efforts and defend the Higher National Education Fund (PTPTN) loan scheme.

“Those who borrow money should pay their debts. Malaysia is not yet a developed country; it cannot afford to bear the costs of each citizen’s expenditure.

“The scholarships the government offers to students with excellent SPM results should suffice. Those who fared less well, but wish to enrol in university, should pay for it themselves or take out loans.

“If they excel in university, the loan will be abolished and turned into a scholarship,” he said.