Malaysia

OWC rings in Prophet’s birthday with sex ed drive

By Syed Mu’az Syed Putra
January 25, 2012

PETALING JAYA, Jan 25 — The Obedient Wives Club (OWC) courted controversy again today with the launch of its new campaign, “The Prophet, Islam’s Sacred Sex Figure”, to commemorate Maulidur Rasul this year.

The 12-day affair, held in conjunction with the Prophet Muhammad’s birthday tomorrow, is aimed at reversing moral decay in Muslim society.

OWC president Fauziah Ariffin (left) and international vice-president Dr Rohaya Mohamad. — file picOWC president Fauziah Ariffin (left) and international vice-president Dr Rohaya Mohamad. — file picOWC president Fauziah Ariffin said the campaign would urge Muslim couples to better emulate Muhammad’s life, which Muslims had strayed from.

“Of course the Prophet should be our reference, and this includes aspects of the family as well as our sex life,” she said at the campaign launch at Pusat Perdagangan Pelangi here.

“When the topic of sacred sex is brought up, many forget that it’s part and parcel of the affairs between man and wife, and is something we do every day.”

If Muslims live their lives while adhering to principles grounded in Islam, then all homosexual acts can be avoided, Fauziah added.

Earlier in her opening speech, she said Islam allowed sex but it must be “sacred sex” between a husband and wife, not gay or abnormal sex that went against God’s teachings.

“We feel compelled to invite Muslims to live the Islamic way. The husband leads and the wife follows, but it appears the faithful have failed,” she said.

The OWC, which believes women should behave like “first-class whores” for their husbands if they wished their marriages to succeed, last hit the headlines in October when it published an explicit guide to “Islamic sex”.

The book, which caused an uproar among the public and women’s rights groups, was later banned by the Home Ministry.

The ministry said the book was banned because of OWC’s links to the outlawed Al-Arqam movement, and for falling foul of the strict censorship guidelines of the Department of Islamic Development (Jakim).

The OWC was founded by Global Ikhwan, an offshoot of Al-Arqam.

The club has branched out to Indonesia, Singapore and Jordan, and claims to have 2,000 members, most of whom are Malaysians.