Qatar’s pearl divers seek tradition and riches

From a distance it could be a scene from Qatar's ancient past, long before the country's modern-day wealth was secured by the discovery of gas and oil. Several kilometres off the coast of...

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Breastfeeding may protect baby from pollution

A new study from the University of the Basque Country, Spain, finds that breastfeeding may lessen the negative impact of some environmental pollutants common to high-traffic areas. Researcher...

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Longer, stronger…study reveals more reasons to take your vitamin E

Long established as a powerful antioxidant, vitamin E is important for the membrane that envelops your muscle cells, promoting proper healing from the natural tears that take place when you work...

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Walking tall, falling short: high-heel injuries on the rise

High-heeled-shoe-related injuries doubled between 2002 and 2012, according to a new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in the US. We're not just talking about blisters. In...

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How an Iraqi friar saved ancient Christian manuscripts from Isis

Bullets whistled overhead, a black Islamic State flag flapping in the distance, but all Friar Najeeb Michaeel could think of as he fled the jihadists was how to save hundreds of ancient Iraqi...

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New music system could make you an exercise lover

Personalised music playlists with tempo-pace synchronisation turned a group of cardiac rehab patients into devoted fitness enthusiasts, increasing adherence by 70%, according to a new...

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Cold weather more lethal than hot spells, says study

Colder weather kills more people than hot spells, a probe into a key issue of public-health policy said on Thursday. Researchers looked into 74 million deaths between 1985 and 2012 in 13...

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World of diversity in plankton

A world of diversity has been discovered in plankton, the tiny plants, viruses and embryonic fish that are a favourite food of whales and supply much of the planet's oxygen, researchers said...

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For a tighter tummy eat your meals, don’t skip them

Skipping meals could lead to abdominal weight gain, according to a new study on mice from Ohio State University. Mice that ate one large meal and fasted the rest of the day developed the...

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Lotsa twerking and lolz in new Scrabble dictionary

"Twerking", "hashtag" and "facetime" are among 6,500 brash new entries in the Scrabble "Bible" that reflect the Internet age but have left traditionalists squirming. The number of new words in...

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Thailand could stop thousands of HIV deaths with more tests, treatment

Thailand could prevent more than 5,000 HIV-related deaths in the next decade if it expanded HIV testing and treatment among gays in Bangkok, where about one in three males who have sex with men...

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Giant pandas not evolved to eat bamboo, says study

Despite two million years of munching almost exclusively on bamboo, the giant panda's gut has not adapted to eating the plant – putting the creatures in an "evolutionary dilemma", scientists said...

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Americans tweet, text, surf… while driving

It's not just texting: American motorists admit to surfing the Web, posting tweets and even taking selfies while behind the wheel, a new survey shows. The poll released by AT&T as part of a...

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Human ancestors made stone tools earlier than previously known

Our ancient ancestors made stone tools, a milestone achievement along the path of human progress, much earlier than previously thought and far before the appearance of the first known member of...

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Caffeine link in lower levels of erectile dysfunction

Men who drank two to three cups of coffee a day, or their equivalent in caffeine, were found to be less likely to have erectile dysfunction (ED) in a study from the University of Texas Health...

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Lee Kuan Yew among 50 influential Peranakans featured in showcase

The late Lee Kuan Yew may never have publicly declared his Peranakan roots, but Singapore’s first prime minister, who was of Hakka and Chinese Peranakan descent, will be one of the 50 Babas and...

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Pop lyrics getting dumber, says research

Lyrics across a variety of pop genres have been losing sophistication over the last ten years, according to an analysis by Andrew Powell-Morse of ticket marketplace SeatSmart. Powell-Morse...

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To garden, or not to garden? Study examines urban soil

City-grown vegetables are likely safe to eat, according to a new study that takes a look at the increasingly popular practice of urban gardening. Certain horticultural techniques could reduce...

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Omega-3s may boost cognitive flexibility in at-risk older adults

A study by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has found that for adults at risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's, consuming more omega-3 fatty acids could have a positive effect...

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High salt diet could put the brakes on puberty

High salt diets – the kind that's increasingly common in the West – could delay puberty, according to a new study. "Current salt-loading in Western populations has the potential to drastically...

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