Ode to the range: Cowboys take to prose to celebrate US West

When long-time bronc rider Paul Zarzyski needed to rest his aching bones after an adrenaline-charged stint on torquing horseflesh, he often turned to the last thing most people would associate...

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Just four bits of credit card data can identify most anyone

Just four bits of information gleaned from a shopper's credit card can be used to identify almost anyone, suggesting that even anonymous big data sets can breach individual privacy, researchers...

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Thai vigilantes take up fight against human trafficking

Bullet-proof vest, shotgun, sunglasses: Kompat Sompaorat could be mistaken for a member of a Swat team. He actually belongs to a motley group of Thai civilians who, frustrated by their...

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Tourism changes heritage clan jetties while old traditions stay

From a private neighbourhood, where many of its residents are related to each other and share a common surname, the clan jetties in Weld Quay, Penang, have transformed into a hot spot for...

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As smokers spark up e-cigs to quit, traditional aids suffer

When Marty Weinstein decided to quit smoking, he took a friend's advice and tried electronic cigarettes rather than government-approved nicotine replacement products. Weinstein, 58, has gone...

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Women joining Isis militants ‘cheerleaders, not victims’

Western women who join Islamic State militants are driven by the same ideological passion as many male recruits and should be seen as potentially dangerous cheerleaders, not victims, experts said...

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How these energy geeks are reimagining an old school utility

Welcome to the utility industry's future – or at least that's what Southern California Edison is hoping. Here in a non-descript, 53,500-square-foot building, the US$12 billion (RM44 billion)...

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French court rules baby names ‘Nutella’, ‘Strawberry’ in bad taste

A French court has blocked parents from naming their baby girl Nutella after the hazelnut spread that is a staple in Gallic households, arguing it would make her the target of mockery. A...

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Americans still confusing Sikhs for Muslims, study shows

More than a decade after 9/11, Americans who come across a turban-wearing Sikh are still prone to mistaking him for a Muslim, according to a study released Monday. Sixty percent of Americans...

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Why studying all night may not work

Memory neurons lull us to sleep in order to consolidate what we have learned, say researchers from Brandeis University in the US, who advise students against pulling all-nighters to prepare for...

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Chinese conductor sees new bridges with West

China's leading conductor, Long Yu has set a goal of expanding his orchestra's exposure to the world. But as he spends time in the West, he has also found another mission – showcasing the...

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After 44 years, Miami orca may edge closer to freedom

Lolita, a killer whale that has lived in a tank at Miami's Seaquarium for 44 years, could move a step closer to freedom this week. After decades of campaigning, animal rights activists hope US...

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Book of horrors: Nazi camp survivors in US recall Auschwitz

In a little leather book, the kind some men use to list lovers, Holocaust survivor Hy Abrams keeps the names that still haunt him: Auschwitz, Plaszow, Mauthausen, Melk and Ebensee. It has been...

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South Korean children navigate rocky road to K-pop stardom

Nine-year-old Kim Si-yoon has no time to throw tantrums. She wakes up at half-past seven for school, followed by hours of voice training, dance lessons and cram school before crashing into bed...

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10 capture pain, devastation of east coast floods for ‘BAH’ fundraiser

Ten photographers, who covered the recent floods in the northeastern states of the peninsula, have joined forces with the National Institute for Electoral Integrity (NIEI) to present “BAH” – a...

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Disenchanted militants in south Asia eye Islamic State with envy

Splits within the Taliban, and doubts over whether its elusive leader is even alive, are driving a growing number of militant commanders in Afghanistan and Pakistan towards Islamic State (IS) for...

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Hungarian space-age piano scales new heights, creator says

In the 19th century, piano makers competed to make special instruments for Hungarian virtuoso Franz Liszt, the world's first piano superstar. Now Hungary is returning the favour with a...

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Pill could make jet lag a thing of the past

Resetting the circadian rhythm, what's also known as the body's internal clock, could soon be a simple question of taking a pill, according to researchers at McGill University in Canada. Their...

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An inviting hand: Calligrapher to the fashion world

His hand is steady and sure as it delicately traces the contours of the biggest names in the world of style: the celebrities, the magazine editors, the clients. Nicolas Ouchenir is a...

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Nigerians face killings, hunger in Boko Haram’s ‘state’

Boko Haram says it is building an Islamic state that will revive the glory days of northern Nigeria's medieval Muslim empires, but for those in its territory life is a litany of killings,...

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