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From George to George - Tay Tian Yan

The Emergency Ordinance was implemented in 1948 and Chinese new villages were born out of the full-fledge confrontation between the colonial government and the CPM.

The colonialists adopted the segregation policy to fend off Chinese residents from the reach of communist influences. The CPM was isolated politically and economically, its material resources severed.

The British strategy was of utmost brillance, sealing thorough victory with minimal resources and casualties, which the Americans later desired to duplicate in their war in Vietnam but to little success, thanks to the varying environment.

The King of England back at the time was King George VI.

Sure enough, the King had little to do with our new villages. He was actually a monarch without much power in hand. He was probably not even aware of what was going on in a remote colony in the Orient.

Father of Queen Elizabeth II, grandfather of Charles the eternal king-in-waiting, great-grandfather of the handsome Prince William, and the great-great-grandfather of the newborn Prince George. King George VI was nothing more than an ordinary monarch who inherited the Crown because his elder brother King Edward VIII abdicated the throne in order to marry a commoner lady, who was also an American divorcee.

The King suffered severe stammering, which made him feel inferior ever since young and which later made him an alcoholic and smoker as he sought solace from his defect.

His pressure was doubled as he ascended to the throne so much so that he had to seek help from speech therapists, as vividly illustrated in the Oscar-winning movie "The King's Speech".

At the end of the story, the King successfully recited the speech declaring war on Germany having overcome his own obstacles to gain broad recognition from his subjects.

A more recent movie, "Hyde Park on Hudson", also talks about King George VI, and his visit to the United States and friendship with President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

In the movie, George looked awkward on the outside but was passionate inside.

Unfortunately, he was under stress not to freely express himself given his status as the King of England and watchful eyes of his wife, the Queen. But under Roosevelt's guidance, he began to demonstrate his child-like playfulness and male personality.

While King George VI could easily drift into oblivion from public memory, the infant George steals the attention and affection of the world over. Because of this cute little prince, the affinity for the British royalty swells among the people, indirectly lifting the morale and popularity of the royal family.

Economists estimate that the spinoff from the birth of Prince George could kickstart the otherwise stagnant British economy.

From the Old George to the Little George, the United Kingdom has experienced gigantic changes. It was still the seat of the vast British Empire when the Old George was on the throne, with colonies big and small scattered across the globe.

For the half century that followed, the influence of Britain quickly dwindled, its military and economic might on steady decline and its colonies freed one after another.

The aura of nobility is nevertheless still over the frailing royalty, and that explains why the birth of Little George has brought so much bliss and joy.

From New Village we have deviated to the Georges. Today, the Britons hardly bear any grudge against the Germans and would not feel sensitive talking about their continental neighbours.

Unfortunately, some in this country are still sceptical and repulsive on any mention of the Communist Party of Malaya. How weird! - mysinchew.com, August 1, 2013.

* This is the personal opinion of the writer or publication and does not necessarily represent the views of The Malaysian Insider.

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